How Tesla could revolutionise petrol engines with its next-gen lithium ion battery

Tesla could change the way we get petrol, according to the company’s Chief Executive Elon Musk.

Mr Musk said on Friday that he was looking forward to having the company turn Tesla into a car maker, not just a tech giant.

He made the remarks during a panel at the British Automobile Association’s annual convention.

The Tesla CEO said his company had not yet taken delivery of the Model 3 electric car, but he did say that the company could “have a lot more” in store for the vehicle than what is currently on sale.”

But we’re not going to do that just by putting batteries in the car.”

The Tesla CEO said his company had not yet taken delivery of the Model 3 electric car, but he did say that the company could “have a lot more” in store for the vehicle than what is currently on sale.

The Tesla Model 3, which will have an expected price tag of $35,000 (£21,500) before incentives, is set to go on sale in 2021.

But Mr Musk said that Tesla’s electric cars could revolutionize the way petrol was made.

“It’s not that we are going to make gasoline all the time, it’s that we will make petrol at a much lower cost,” he said.

“We will make gasoline at a lower cost in 20 years than it is today.”

That’s what you can expect.

“The CEO said that he thought the Model S electric car could become the first electric car to have a range of 100km (62 miles), although that was not confirmed.

Tesla’s latest electric car is called the Model X, but it will be able to go from 0 to 100km/h (62mph) in about seven seconds and is expected to have more range than the Model 7, which is expected in 2021 to have an estimated range of 400km.

Tesla is expected sell the Model Y, which could be a successor to the Model 9 electric car.”

You could put the Model 10 on the road, but we will not put it on the roads because it’s too expensive,” Mr Musk added.”

In 20 years, you will not see cars that are faster than the Tesla Model 10, because they are very expensive.

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